agree disagree

SHOWING AGREEMENT

1. JE SUIS D’ACCORD

This is an excellent phrase which is widely used in France and la Francophonie (French-speaking communities). It simply means “I agree,” and can be easily adapted to further emphasize your support for someone’s opinion.

For example:

Je suis totalement d’accord avec toi / vous
I totally agree with you.

Je suis à cent pour cent d’accord avec toi / vous
I am 100% in agreement with you.

Note that above, you’ll have to distinguish between the correct form of “you” depending on who you’re conversing with (Confused? Tu and Vous in French).

2. JE SUIS DE TON AVIS / DE VOTRE AVIS

Another way to express your agreement in French is to say “Je suis de ton avis” or “Je suis de votre avis” which both mean, “I agree with you.” The phrase literally translates to “I am of your opinion.”

Likewise, you can add an adverb, such as “totalement,” “complètement” or “entièrement,” to stress that you absolutely agree with someone.

3. TOUT À FAIT !

This is definitely a useful phrase to have up your sleeve for spoken French, and that’s what it means: definitely!

More informal versions include “Carrément !” or “Absolument !”

However! Watch out for “définitivement,” which is a faux ami (a false friend). While it looks like the French equivalent of “definitely,” it actually means “permanently” or “once and for all.” It’s definitely a faux pas to avoid!

4. MOI AUSSI / MOI NON PLUS

Both of these expressions can be used to agree with someone in French and translate as “me too” in English. However, the context for each is a bit different.

When you support a positive statement, you would use “moi aussi.”

Je veux aller à la plage cet été !
I want to go to the beach this summer!
Moi aussi!
Me too!

Compare this to when you support a negative statement. You would use the phrase “moi non plus.” And the “plus” is actually pronounced “ploo” without the “s” sound at the end.

5. TU AS RAISON / VOUS AVEZ RAISON

Telling someone that they are right about a statement is a great way to agree with them.

In French, you can say “Tu as raison” for someone you know well, such as a friend or family member, and for someone you don’t know very well, you should say “Vous avez raison” for politeness.

SHOWING DISAGREEMENT

6. JE NE SUIS PAS D‘ACCORD

You’ve guessed it – you can very easily disagree in French by adding “ne … pas” to “Je suis d’accord.”

And when speaking, you can drop the “ne” and merge “je” and “suis” together, which sounds like “shui”, to sound more like a native speakerEt voilà !  You have a great phrase which you can easily slip into French conversation!

Le PSG est la meilleure équipe de club française de l’histoire.
P.S.G. is the best French soccer team in history.
J’suis pas d’accord.
I don’t agree.

7. TU AS TORT

This is an informal way to tell someone that they are wrong, and can be very useful if you and a friend are having a heated discussion about the best dessert ever, or any other important conversation topics!

8. TU TE TROMPES / VOUS VOUS TROMPEZ

Both phrases translate into English as “you are mistaken” so they are a bit more formal of an expression than “Tu as tort.”

Like other phrases in this list, you can say “tu” for someone you know well, and “vous” for someone you don’t know very well.

9. N’IMPORTE QUOI !

While this phrase generally means “anything,” you can also use it in French conversation to mean “Nonsense!” or “Rubbish!”

So it is quite informal, however commonly used in France.

(Psst, if you want more informal speech then check out some of our French slang lists).

You can also say “C’est n’importe quoi” to stress that you completely disagree with someone’s view, like “That’s rubbish!” in English.

10. PAS MOI / MOI SI !

You can easily add one of these phrases to French conversation when you don’t agree with someone. Similarly to “moi aussi” and “moi non plus,” they both mean “me too” and the context for each is slightly different.

If you oppose a positive statement, you can say “Pas moi.”

Je veux aller à la plage cet été !
I want to go to the beach this summer!
Pas moi, il fait trop chaud.
Not me, it’s too hot.

But if you don’t agree with a negative statement, you can say “moi si.” “Si” loosely translates as “but yes” in this situation and is used as a contrary to a negative statement.

Je ne veux pas aller à l’école aujourd’hui.
I do not want to go to school today.
Moi si.
Me, yes (I want to go to school).

CONCLUSION

This was just a short list of 10 ways to agree and disagree in French. Actually it was probably more than 10 ways.

What others methods do you know or use? And did you find the list helpful? Leave a comment and feel free to share this article to those it would help!

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Amy Adams
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